SEPTEMBER NEWSLETTER 2019

Posted by ORBIT LOGISTICS
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Welcome to the September Edition of the Orbit Newsletter

Spring is coming, and with it comes the usual Spring fare; changing weather, footy finals, hayfever, and shipping peak season.

In local discussions in Hong Kong and from the recent feedback from Shipping lines, the peak season for exports ex China/HK should be a strong season, which has the potential to bring space and rate pressures.  The shipping landscape continues to change, especially through mergers and takeovers.  This flows into the structure of the trading lanes and services, with shipping consortium’s changing members and services.

Pressure will come on freight rates, with most shipping lines broadcasting plans to implement freight rate increases around USD $250.00 per 20’GP, for cargo out of Korea, Taiwan, HK & China.  This is the typical ambit claim that precedes the peak season.  It’s now called a rate restoration program, but in reality it is a peak season surcharge.

We can assure you that Orbit Logistics are, and will continue to be in robust negotiations with shipping lines at origin and destination, ensuring the best outcomes for our clients.

As always, please contact our office with any inquiries on the Newsletter topics.

Happy Reading!

Gerard Reed
General Manager


Botany’s container numbers take a dip

PORT Botany saw a quieter month than usual in June with container throughput decreasing from the previous month as well as the same period last year.

Total container trade through Port Botany over June came to 202,293 TEU – a decrease of 5% on the May (213,771 TEU), and a drop of 7% on June 2018’s total container throughput (217,615 TEU).

The month’s volumes of full imports were down by 9% on the previous year to 100,324 TEU and, according to NSW Ports, the largest decreases were experienced by miscellaneous manufactured articles (down by 25.9%) , non-metallic minerals (down by 16.7%) as well as iron and steel (down by 15.3%).

Export full volumes were also down on last year’s figures, dropping 9.6% to 42,661 TEU. Commodities with the largest decreases were commodities, miscellaneous manufactured articles (27.7%) and wood & timber (10.2%). Paper and paper products were also down (4.9%).

Export empties were at their lowest since May 2018, with 58,506 TEU leaving the port. This was down 15.5% on May and 15.2% on the FYTD monthly average of 68,693 TEU. Empty imports for June came to a total of 802 TEU.

There were 99 container vessel visits during the month of June (eight more than June 2018), with the largest numbers of vessels being in the 4000-5000 TEU and 5000-6000 TEU ranges (30 visits and 27 visits, respectively).

At 538,604 revenue tonnes, June’s non-containerised trade through Port Botany was up 24% on the previous month, and up 21% on June 2018.


YM Efficiency clean up expected in 2020

YM Efficiency clean up expected in 2020

Damaged cargo onboard YM Efficiency. Image: ATSBON 1 June 2018, the Liberian-flagged container ship YM Efficiency lost 81 containers in heavy weather about 30 kilometres southeast of Newcastle.

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority has taken the next step to recovering shipping containers lost overboard from the vessel. It has opened a tender for salvage and offshore construction operators to remove containers for safe disposal onshore.

The closing date for tenders is 19 September, with the clean-up expected to begin early next year.

The successful operator will work closely with AMSA to mitigate any identified risks to the marine environment.

AMSA and NSW Maritime will host public information sessions to give members of the community an opportunity to learn more about the salvage operation and how they will be managing waste.

You can find out more about the incident and AMSA’s sub-sea search for the lost containers at: https://www.amsa.gov.au/marine-environment/incidents-and-exercises/ym-efficiency-salvage-operation


ANL updates Australia to south-east Asia services

About Victoria’s commercial ports

Victoria’s commercial trading ports are engines for economic growth. They provide critical transfer points in Victoria’s transport network and connect Victoria to international markets.

Port infrastructure pricing and access review

The Victorian Freight Plan identified an action to “investigate options for the future role of Government in regulating pricing/charges, and access to and from the port.”

This action was developed in response to industry concerns regarding increasing infrastructure charges by stevedores at the Port of Melbourne and the associated flow-on cost to industry.

The Department has been asked to conduct this review will assess port pricing/charges at, and access issues into and out of, the Port of Melbourne.

While Port tenants now determine their own pricing, the review provides an opportunity to look more broadly at supply chain charges and access.

The review will be conducted by an independent reviewer appointed by the Victorian Government who will prepare recommendations addressing the terms of reference.

Freight Victoria has established a Review Advisory Board (RAB), made up of key government department and regulatory representatives, to oversee and support the review.

The independent reviewer will undertake a targeted consultation process, including formal submissions, with key industry stakeholders identified by the RAB.

These will include container stevedores, container shipping lines, importers and exporters, truck and train operators, the port lessee and government stakeholders.

The independent reviewer is to provide a draft report and a final report with recommendations by the end of 2019.


Port Pricing And Access Review

Terms of Reference

Investigate options for the future role of Government in regulating pricing/charges, and access to and from the Port of Melbourne
Freight movements are essential to businesses and our economy. The ability for port users to have competitive access and pricing to the Port of Melbourne and to services within the container supply chain is critical for industry and the State’s trade competitiveness.
The movement of containers through the Port of Melbourne is a key freight task for Victoria. The port is a major node in one of Australia’s most significant supply chains and handles the majority of Victoria’s container imports and exports.
In 2017-18, the Port of Melbourne handled 2.9 million twenty-foot-equivalent units (TEU) of containers equating to around 75% of the Port of Melbourne’s trade.

The Victorian Freight Plan

The Victorian Freight Plan, Delivering the Goods, identified an action to ‘investigate options for the future role of Government in regulating pricing/charges, and access to and from the port’. This action was developed in response to industry concerns regarding increasing infrastructure charges by stevedores at the Port of Melbourne and the associated flow on cost to industry.
An infrastructure charge is a charge levied by stevedores on land transport operators (rail and road operators) when collecting or delivering loaded containers from the Port of Melbourne. It is sometimes referred to as a port access charge as land transport operators pay the charge to access the stevedore’s container terminal site at the port.
Stevedores are part of the broader container supply chain which includes international shipping lines, the port lessee, cargo owners (importers and exporters), land transport operators (road and rail transport operators) and related infrastructure operators such as intermodal terminals and empty container parks.
Each of these companies charges a fee for moving containers and plays an important role in facilitating the transport of containerised freight in and out of the Port of Melbourne.

Scope of the Review

This review will assess port pricing/charges at, and access issues into and out of, the Port of Melbourne. While industry is currently concerned with the infrastructure charge, it is important that any review of charges is carried out in the context of the overall Port of Melbourne container supply chain. For the purposes of this review, the Port of Melbourne container supply chain is defined as the movement of import and export containers from the wharf to the port gate, not from origin to final destination.
The review will be conducted by an independent reviewer appointed by the Victorian Government who will prepare recommendations addressing the terms of reference. Freight Victoria has established a Review Advisory Board (RAB), made up of key government department and regulatory representatives, to oversee and support the review.

Terms of Reference

The following are the terms of reference for the Review:

  1. The reviewer is to examine how efficiently the Port of Melbourne container supply chain has performed over time. In doing so, the reviewer should assess:
  1. the cost to cargo owners of moving a container through the Port of Melbourne and the breakdown of those costs;
  2. the current contracting arrangements among participants within the supply chain and the implications of these arrangements for supply chain costs;
  3. the extent to which market power is held by key participants in the Port of
  4. Melbourne container supply chain and whether this has changed over time;
  5. reasons for recent increases in container stevedores’ infrastructure charges;
  6. the impact of recent increases in container stevedores’ infrastructure charges on transport operators, cargo owners and any other parties;
  7. access arrangements facing transport operators into and out of the port, including:
  1. terminal access arrangements (carrier agreements) between transport operators and stevedores;
  2. the vehicle booking system and the incentives and costs it creates in relation to accessing the port;
  3. any other impediments to landside performance; and
  4. potential improvements to existing landside performance standards and reporting.
  1. any other relevant matters.

2.  Having had regard to each of the matters above, the reviewer is to recommend regulatory or other options to improve the efficiency of pricing/charges at, and             access arrangements to and from, the Port of Melbourne.

Consultation Process

The independent reviewer should undertake a targeted consultation process with key stakeholders identified by the RAB. These may include container stevedores, container shipping lines, importers and exporters, truck and train operators, the port lessee and government stakeholders. The process will allow for formal submissions from the targeted industry participants to inform the review.
Timing and Reporting: The independent reviewer is to provide:

  • monthly progress reports to the Review Advisory Board;
  • a draft report by October 2019; and
  • a final report with recommendations by November 2019.

Signed

MELISSA HORNE MP
Minister for Ports and Freight


SEPTEMBER 2019 VOID PLAN & SKIP PORT CALLING

Please find below void plan and vessel skip port calling in Sept. The blank sailing mainly affects Xiamen, Qingdao and Shanghai ports this time.

We will re-arrange the cargo to the available sailing during this period. For any further void sailings, we will send you updates as soon as we are notified.

We count the vessel void into that WEEK based on the first call China port.   Some China ports call later, they might already be entered into the next week, please refer to the POL ETD.

WEEK 36 – A3N – Vessel slide one week to week 37 due to heavy delay previously and skip call MEL. However, all MEL/SYD/BNE cargo will change other sailing in KHH (Kaohsiung).
A3N SERVICE  (COUNTED FROM QDO ONBOARD DATE)
OPERATOR: ANL / COSCO / OOCL
VESSEL SIZE: AROUND 6500 TEUS
ROUTING: QDO – SHA – KHH – MEL – SYD  –  BNE
ORIGINAL ETD QDO: 7 SEP / ETD SHA: 10 SEP à ETD QDO: 14 SEP / ETD SHA: 17 SEP (slide one week)
ORIGINAL ETA MEL: 24 SEP / ETA SYD: 27 SEP  / ETA BNE: 30 SEP

WEEK 37 – A3N – Whole vessel blank sailing
A3N SERVICE  (COUNTED FROM QDO ONBOARD DATE)
OPERATOR: ANL / COSCO / OOCL
VESSEL SIZE: AROUND 6500 TEUS
ROUTING: QDO – SHA – KHH – MEL – SYD  –  BNE
ORIGINAL ETD QDO: 14 SEP / ETD SHA: 17 SEP
ORIGINAL ETA MEL: 01 OCT / ETA SYD: 04 OCT  / ETA BNE: 07 OCT

WEEK 38– A3N SKIP QDO ONLY
A3N SERVICE  (COUNTED FROM QDO ONBOARD DATE)
OPERATOR: ANL / COSCO / OOCL
VESSEL SIZE: AROUND 6500 TEUS
ROUTING: QDO – SHA – KHH – MEL – SYD  –  BNE
ORIGINAL ETD QDO: 21 SEP (SKIP) / ETD SHA: 24 SEP
ORIGINAL ETA MEL: 08 OCT / ETA SYD: 11 OCT  / ETA BNE: 14 OCT
 A3C SKIP XMN ONLY
A3C SERVICE (COUNTED FROM SHA ONBOARD DATE)
OPERATOR: ANL / COSCO / OOCL
VESSEL SIZE: AROUND 5500 TEUS
ROUTING: XMN – SHA – NGB – SYD – MEL – BNE
ORIGINAL ETD XMN: 15 SEP (SKIP) / ETD SHA: 20 SEP / ETD NGB: 22 SEP
ORIGINAL ETA SYD: 03 OCT / ETA MEL: 07 OCT / ETA BNE: 13 OCT

WEEK 39– NAEX – Whole vessel blank sailing
NAEX SERVICE (COUNTED FROM QDO ONBOARD DATE)
OPERATOR: APL / EMC / H-LLOYD / ONE / SINOTRANS / YML
VESSEL SIZE: AROUND 4400 – 4600 TEUS
ROUTING: QDO – SHA – NGB – MEL – SYD – BNE
ORIGINAL ETD QDO: 22 SEP / ETD SHA: 25 SEP / ETD NGB: 26 SEP
ORIGINAL ETA MEL: 08 OCT / ETA SYD:  11 OCT / ETA BNE: 14 OCT
–A3C SKIP XMN ONLY
A3C SERVICE (COUNTED FROM SHA ONBOARD DATE)
OPERATOR: ANL / COSCO / OOCL
VESSEL SIZE: AROUND 5500 TEUS
ROUTING: XMN – SHA – NGB – SYD – MEL – BNE
ORIGINAL ETD XMN: 22 SEP (SKIP) / ETD SHA: 27 SEP / ETD NGB: 29 SEP
ORIGINAL ETA SYD: 10 OCT / ETA MEL: 14 OCT / ETA BNE: 20 OCT


NZ CUSTOMS SERVICE – REVIEW OF GOODS CLEARANCE FEES

The New Zealand Customs Service has commenced a review of the fees that they charge for services, including the release of a Discussion Document titled Recovering the Cost of Customs’ Goods Clearance Activities and a summary Information Sheet.

In a nut-shell, New Zealand customs cost recovery has considerably less “cross-subsidisation” than in the Australian cost recovery modelling (with extra levels of complexity).

Australian cost recovery is primarily on the Full Import Declaration (FID) cross-subsidising exports, cargo reporters and low value import consignments under AUD$1,000.

In contrast, New Zealand has separate charging for each import / export sector and are looking to “increase scope” to recover on air cargo reports for low value goods under NZ$1,000 – the quantum of the cost recovery fee for low value goods is not specified however the preferred collection mechanism proposed is via the Inward Cargo Transaction Fee administered against consolidators / freight forwarders and transporters / carriers.

The outcome of the review will undoubtedly be examined by Australian Border and Biosecurity agencies as a part of future cost recovery reforms.

Submissions

The New Zealand Customs Service are accepting submissions to feesreview@customs.govt.nz until 30 August 2019 – refer HERE

Consultation on Goods Clearance fees

General InformationConsultation on proposed changes to goods clearance fees.

Goods Clearance Fees Review

Customs clears all goods entering or leaving New Zealand. This process is designed to detect illegal activity, and ensure New Zealand’s import and export controls are complied with. It also ensures that importers and exporters declare the correct classification, origin and value of their goods, and that they pay the appropriate duties and taxes.

Our fees were last reviewed in 2006, and since then changes in our operating environment, including increases in the volumes of imports and exports, mean that our fees no longer reflect the true cost of clearing goods.

We also know that our charging needs to be more transparent and costs need to be fairly shared across groups.

The review involves:

  • considering who should pay
  • understanding the actual costs of goods clearance
  • identifying fees that will recover those costs appropriately.

It also considers:

  • recovering costs associated with the enforcement of intellectual property rights
  • the hourly rate we charge for services that Customs’ staff provide outside standard working hours.

Consultation documents

The background to this review and the proposed changes are set out in the documents listed below:

Deciding who should pay for goods clearance

To determine who should pay for our goods clearance activities we developed a cost recovery framework based on accepted cost recovery principles.  The key principle underpinning the framework is equity – those who generate need for and/or benefit from our services should pay for them.

The introduction of an Activity Based Costing model (PDF 2.5 MB) enabled us to identify how we use our resources (people, premises and equipment), and the cost of our goods clearance activities. As a result, we now have greater transparency around how we cost our activities and apply our fees – Pricing and Fee Setting Methodology (PDF 1.8 MB).

We have had our methodology quality assured by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PDF 1.1 MB) to ensure our approach and logic is sound.

Consultation

Consultation closed on 30 August 2019.  All submissions will be considered and we will present our recommendations to the Minister of Customs.

We intend to publish the submissions we received, as well as a summary of submissions covering the main themes that submitters identified, the key decisions that have been made, and the rationale for each decision.

If you have any questions about the consultation process, please email feesreview@customs.govt.nz.

Further Information

You can read the Cabinet material: Public consultation on Customs’ Proposed Goods Clearance Fees (PDF 1.2 MB).

Read frequently asked questions and answers about the review and proposed new charges.


Biosecurity Import Levy – deferred implementation

Further to our commentary from Tuesday 6 August 2019 titled Will common sense prevail on the Biosecurity Import Levy, Freight & Trade Alliance (FTA) has today received confirmation that the 1 September 2019 implementation for the Biosecurity Import Levy is unachievable –  of ongoing concern is that the revised implementation timeframe, quantum and collection mechanism(s) remain unknown.

Since 1996/97, our border and biosecurity agencies have been extremely efficient at collecting taxes, levies and import processing charges via the entry / Full Import Declaration – why on earth the government would even consider a deviation from this collection mechanism is staggering.

A disastrous result for importers would be to wear the cascading costs of administrative fees through the supply chain should the government revert back to its original models (or a hybrid model collecting some revenue from the FID) by collecting the Biosecurity Import Levy from stevedores and / or shipping lines.

This entire management of the levy over the last 16 months has been an example of deplorable public administration – stay tuned for the next chapter in this ongoing saga.

 


BMSB Update

 

BMSB Season as commenced on 01 September 2019 through to 31st May 2020.

Target countries have been expanded to 32 countries in North America & Europe for this season.

We will keep you updated with any new developments as they occur.  We anticipate this season will be another challenging time for importers.

Updates from Department of Agriculture

What has changed?

In response to the rapid expansion of BMSB throughout Europe and North America, the Department of Agriculture (the department), has implement heightened seasonal measures to manage the risk of BMSB from entering and establishing in Australia during the 2019-20 BMSB risk season.

For the 2019-20 BMSB risk season, heightened biosecurity measures will apply to:

  • certain goods manufactured in, or shipped from target risk countries, and/or
  • vessels that berth at, load or tranship from target risk countries

from 1 September 2019 and that arrive in Australian territory by 31 May 2020 (inclusive).

Target high risk goods shipped between 1 September and 30 April need to be treated, and will be referred for intervention if they arrive by 31 May 2020.

For goods that are shipped prior to 30 April and arrive after 31 May, they may be subject to intervention as required.

For further information on the 2019-20 seasonal measures please visit the BMSB webpage.

Master Consolidator Identification (MC ID) Registration and Declarations

Under the 2019-20 BMSB seasonal measures, new registration and early reporting requirements by Master Consolidators for LCL/FAK containers will be required as published through Industry Advice Notice 89-2019 (Final measures for the 2019-20 BMSB risk season).

Master Consolidators who have registered before 27 August should have received an email from the department with their username, password and link to the online lodgement form. If you have registered before this date, and have not received an email please check your junk email folder before contacting the department via email at Seasonal Pests Policy. Master Consolidators that are not registered will not be able to lodge a declaration. Registration and further information including on how to lodge a declaration is available on the 2019-20 BMSB Management of LCL/ FAK webpage.

New Request for Inspection Form

The department has published a new Request for Inspection Form for the BMSB risk season. The form allows industry to advise relevant shipping information about the goods including if shipped as Open Top/ Flat rack or are classified as hazardous goods, and also to advise of a change in location for an inspection. The form will replace the need for industry to call the department and advise this information. The new Inspection form can be downloaded from the Request for Inspection Form webpage.

Offshore Treatment Providers Scheme

The department and the New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries introduced a joint Offshore BMSB Treatment Providers Scheme aligning treatment options, rates and compliance requirements for the 2019-20 BMSB risk season.

All BMSB treatment providers in target risk countries must be registered under the scheme to be able to conduct BMSB treatments. Treatments conducted by an unapproved treatment provider in a target risk country will not be recognised as valid and will be referred for intervention on arrival.

Applications to become a new provider or to renew as a provider under the 2019-20 Offshore BMSB Treatment Providers Scheme can be found on the Offshore BMSB treatments website. Treatment providers that were registered during the 2018-19 BMSB season must complete a renewal application for the 2019-20 season.

Offshore treatment providers are being published on the BMSB Offshore BMSB Treatment Providers Scheme webpage as they are approved.  Offshore treatment providers approved under the scheme must report all BMSB treatment certification issued using the department’s new Offshore BMSB Treatment Certificate Form. Further information on how to lodge the form is available on the 2019-20 BMSB season lodgement page.

Treatment reporting requirements – AEI

The Entity Identifier (AEI) number will again play a key role in identifying target high risk goods that have been treated for BMSB concerns offshore during the 2019-20 BMSB season.

The AEI must be entered for any treatments performed by an approved BMSB offshore treatment provider.

To improve efficiencies for industry there has been some changes to AEI reporting requirements for target high risk goods during the 2019-20 BMSB season. The AEI is now required to only be entered against the first tariff line of the import declaration.

The only exception is for BMSB treatments of break bulk cargo, where the AEI still needs to be entered against every line of target high risk goods.

The department has developed a new AEI reporting web page and guide to assist customs brokers and self-reporting importers with the reporting requirements for the AEI number.

Utilising AEPCOMM for target high risk goods

Accredited persons operating under class 19.2 automatic entry processing for commodities (AEPCOMM) approved arrangement will again be able to utilise AEPCOMM for the management of target high risk BMSB goods during the 2019-20 BMSB season. Pathways approved for AEPCOMM have now been authored into the BMSB hitchhiker pest BICON case and will be available through your BICON AEPCOMM user account. This replaces the class 19.2 Assessment Guide that was utilised during the 2018-19 BMSB season.

The department is working on further enhancements to AEPCOMM settings for target high risk goods and will provide further updates and information during the 2019-20 BMSB season to improve onshore management options.

Please review the available information in BMSB hitchhiker pest BICON case and contact AEP support if you require assistance with your AEPCOMM lodgements.

Further information

For further information regarding BMSB seasonal measures, can be found on the BMSB webpage agriculture.gov.au/bmsb or for policy information email Seasonal Pests Policy.

The Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) hitchhiker pest BICON case has been updated for the 2019-20 risk season and will be published shortly.

If you have any questions or queries, please contact Orbit Logistics.


BMSB Safeguarding draft application form

 

The Department of Agriculture (the department) has provided to DCCC members the following draft copies of the safeguarding application form, additional supply chain details form and a draft of the biosecurity hitchhiker pest contamination guide to assist importers in preparing their applications.
These documents will become available on the department’s website in the coming weeks as sample documents to allow importers to familiarise themselves with the requirements of the scheme and application process prior to the scheme opening for broader applications.

Why BMSB Safeguarding Arrangements ?
The department is developing a new safeguarding arrangements scheme to allow certain goods and supply chains to be recognised under safeguarding arrangements.
Under the scheme, approved participants (importers, NOT customs brokers and forwarders) will be recognised for their ability to manage biosecurity risk offshore, including seasonal hitchhiker pest risk such as BMSB, from the point of manufacture to the point of embarkation.
The scheme will consider the ability of the entity to manage and reduce biosecurity risk by providing risk management plans of the goods they expect to import that may be susceptible to infestation by seasonal hitchhiker pests and/or other contaminants.
The scheme is being trialled with a small number of select importers before being opened to all other importers, however it is unlikely the scheme will be available for the start of the BMSB season and opened to all importers.
We will keep you informed of any further developments as more information on the scheme is made available soon by the department.
Any specific questions relating to the policy for seasonal pests can be emailed to spp@agriculture.gov.au


New, hefty fines for misdeclared cargo

Hapag-Lloyd- AFTER several high-profile incidents such as the Yantian Express fire in January, several ocean carriers have announced heavy fines for misdeclaring hazardous cargo.

Hapag-Lloyd recently announced it would levy a US$15,000 fine for misdeclared hazardous cargo, and said it would hold the shipper liable for all costs and consequences related to violations, fines, damages, incidents, claims and corrective measures resulting from undeclared or misdeclared cargoes.

A statement from the company said it was in the overall interest of safe operation onboard.

“Failure to properly offer and declare hazardous cargoes prior to shipment is a violation of the Hazardous Material Regulations,” the statement said. “Such violations may be subject to monetary fines and/or criminal prosecution under applicable law.”

TT Club has welcomed such initiatives. The international transport insurer said it had growing concerns about the lax cargo packing practices and erroneous, sometimes fraudulent, declaration of cargoes.

TT Club risk management director Peregrine Storrs-Fox said it was clear the shipper has primary responsibility to declare fully and honestly so the carriers are able to take appropriate actions to achieve safe transport.

“Since this is not always the case, carriers have to put in place increasingly sophisticated and costly control mechanisms to ‘know their customers’, screen booking information and physically inspect shipments,” he said.

“Equally, carriers have the opportunity to review any barriers to accurate shipment declaration, including minimising any unnecessary restrictions and surcharges.

“Penalising shippers where deficiencies are found should be applauded. Furthermore, government enforcement agencies are encouraged to take appropriate action under national or international regulations to deter poor practices further.”


Global air freight demand dips in June

Global air freight demand dips in June

GLOBAL air-freight demand decreased by 4.8% in June, compared with the same month last year, measured in freight-tonne-kilometres.

The data released by the International Air Transport Association indicates that this marks the eighth consecutive month of year-on-year decline in freight volumes.

Data in recent months had shown a glimmer of a recovery, but June’s numbers show hope for increased demand was unfounded.

June’s decrease in demand was broad-based, with all regions except Africa showing a decline.

A statement from IATA said capacity growth remains subdued and the cargo load factor continues to fall. IATA pointed out that general trade growth is languishing, with uncertainty compounded by trade tensions between China and the US.

“Global trade continues to suffer as trade tensions – particularly between the US and China – deepen. As a result, air cargo markets continue to contract,” IATA CEO and director general Alexandre de Juniac said.

“Nobody wins a trade war. Borders that are open to trade spread sustained prosperity. That’s what our political leaders must focus on.”

Airlines in Asia-Pacific and the Middle East suffered the sharpest declines in year-on-year growth in total air freight volumes in June 2019. Africa was the only region to show any growth.

Asia-Pacific airlines saw demand for air freight contract by 5.4% in June 2019, compared to the same period in 2018.

While an important factor, IATA said the US-China trade war is not solely responsible for the fall. FTKs for the within-Asia market have decreased more than 10% over the past year. Air freight capacity increased by 1.8% over the same period.

North American airlines’ freight demand decreased by 4.6% in June 2019, compared to the same period a year earlier. Capacity increased by 1.9% over the past year.

European airlines posted a 3.6% decrease in freight demand in June 2019 compared to the same period a year earlier.

Middle Eastern airlines’ freight volumes decreased 7.0% in June 2019 compared to the year-ago period.

Latin American airlines experienced a decrease in freight demand in June 2019 of 1.0% compared to the same period last year. African carriers were the only ones to report growth in June 2019, with an increase in demand of 3.8% compared to the same period a year earlier. This makes Africa the strongest performer for the fourth consecutive month. Capacity grew 16.6%. IATA said the Africa-Asia performance is strong – up 12% year-on-year.


New system for fast container loading

New system for fast container loading

ADAPTALIFT announced it was bringing its container slip-sheet loading system to the Australian market.

The loading system, from Combilift, was engineered specifically for loading 20- and 40-foot containers quickly and efficiently to a maximum capacity of 30 tonnes.

Adaptalift claims this system allows for a 40-foot container to be loaded in six minutes.

The container slip-sheet loading system consists of a free-standing platform with a dual-directional motor-driven pulling mechanism. This moves a Hardox 500 steel sheet, allowing goods to be guided safely into containers.

When the container is fully loaded, a hydraulic rear gate at the end of the platform holds the load in place within the container while the slip sheet is removed and the container is closed and locked.

Adaptalift says this system is suitable for loading cargo such as aluminium, building materials, metals, plastics, steel and timber.


Trade slows slightly in Adelaide during July

PORT of Adelaide experienced its slowest month of container throughput since March this year, according to the latest trade statistics available from Flinders Ports.

The port’s throughput of full containers for July 2019 came to 25,519 TEU, a 12% drop from June’s throughput, and 4% down on July 2018.

Both imports and exports dropped from June’s figures; the former by 9% (to 11,676 TEU) and the latter by 14% (to 13,843 TEU).

Looking at the empties trade last month, 7407 TEU of empty containers crossed the Adelaide wharf, of which 4807 TEU was imported, and 2600 TEU was exported. Singapore was once again the destination for almost three quarters of the port’s exported empties (1946 TEU).

Of the remaining 25%, Malaysia was the most common destination (265 TEU). A massive 95% of the port’s imports empties came from Australian ports (4496 TEU).

Turning to break-bulk, Flinders Ports reported 4323 cars imported into Adelaide over the month, an increase of 37 units on June. The total tonnage came to 7489 tonnes, a drop of 49 tonnes from June.

Major bulk commodities that were imported include petroleum and gas (204,492 tonnes), limestone (173,059 tonnes) and general cargo (27,769 tonnes). Grain was the leading exported good (291,812 tonnes).

Well back were cement/clinker (75,041 tonnes) and mineral sands (52,999). There were 36 cellular container vessel calls over the month at Adelaide, down on June’s yearly high of 39 vessels.


Worldwide Public Holidays In September